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MSF says 33 people still missing after Afghan hospital bombing

A sign is pictured over a black sheet outside the Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland October 7, 2015. The U.S. military took responsibility on Tuesday for a deadly air strike on a hospital in the Afghan city of Kunduz, calling it a mistake and vowing to hold people accountable. Saturday's strike on the Afghan hospital run by Doctors Without Borders, or Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), killed 22 people and deeply angered the medical charity. MSF officials have blamed the United States, demanding an independent investigation into an attack it called a war crime. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse - RTS3C64
A sign is pictured over a black sheet outside the Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland October 7, 2015. The U.S. military took responsibility on Tuesday for a deadly air strike on a hospital in the Afghan city of Kunduz, calling it a mistake and vowing to hold people accountable. Saturday's strike on the Afghan hospital run by Doctors Without Borders, or Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), killed 22 people and deeply angered the medical charity. MSF officials have blamed the United States, demanding an independent investigation into an attack it called a war crime. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse - RTS3C64

Washington: Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) authorities have said that 33 people are still missing almost a week since the deadly US bombing of the hospital run by Doctors Without Borders in Afghanistan.

According to The Washington Times, the charity organisation’s representative in Afghanistan, Guilhem Molinie, said that 24 staff members and nine patients are still missing.

The airstrike had killed 22 people and injured 37 others on Saturday.

There were more than 80 staff members inside the hospital at the time of the bombing.

US President Barack Obama on Wednesday apologised to the director of the organization for the airstrike in Kunduz, that the Pentagon admitted was a mistake.

However, General John F. Campbell, the U.S. commander in Afghanistan, had said that the strike was called in by Afghan forces on the ground, who were fighting Taliban after the militant group successfully recaptured the major city, marking the first success for the group since the U.S. invasion.

Doctors Without Borders has urged an independent probe into the tragedy and called the bombing a war crime.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon is conducting its separate investigation. (ANI)