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Indian-origin restaurateur fined over hygiene in Britain

HDM     ERM     NEWS    LUCY LEESON   07-12-14


Exterior of new restaurant Zaras, Princes avenue, Hull. Pictures: Kate Woolhouse

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HDM ERM NEWS LUCY LEESON 07-12-14 Exterior of new restaurant Zaras, Princes avenue, Hull. Pictures: Kate Woolhouse Prints can be ordered from www.thisisphotosales.co.uk/hullandeastriding or call 08444 060 910

London: An Indian-origin restaurateur in the Scottish city of Aberdeen, was fined for breaching food hygiene standards two years ago, a media report said.

Sujath Ali, the former operator of Zara’s Indian Restaurant located in Burnside Drive, was handed over improvement notices in 2013 following a series of inspections, the Press and Journal website reported.

On August 5, Ali admitted to four charges of failing to comply with the orders at the Aberdeen Sheriff Court.

He has been fined 770 pounds ($1,200).

His solicitor, however, stressed Ali had tried to meet the two-week deadline – despite struggling to pay staff for carrying out the extra cleaning duties.

He was directed to ensure that the kitchen and equipment were cleaned thoroughly under the Food Hygiene (Scotland) Regulations 2006 and European Commissions Act 1972, the report stated.

The 32-year-old, however, failed to ensure all food containers, utensils, knives, peelers, cheese grater and tin opener – which were dirty and sticky when inspectors visited on July 22, 2013 – were cleaned thoroughly.

“He did not ensure all the redundant fridges, including door seals, were clean – with one being used to store dirty utensils and equipment,” the report added.

Inspectors also found that Ali failed to make sure surfaces such as tap, door, fridge and freezer handles throughout the restaurant were clean, with many being dirty and greasy.

“Since the restaurant was open from noon-midnight, seven days a week, leaving limited free time for them to make any real progress, and that he could not afford to pay them any extra,” Ali’s solicitor noted.