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Homemade meals can keep you diabetes-free

A vegetarian kebab is seen at OUR restaurant near the Saint-Lazare train station in Paris October 27, 2014. In a country whose national identity is so closely connected to its cuisine, France's hard right has seized on a growing appetite for kebabs as proof of cultural "islamisation". Some 300 million kebabs at about 6 euros each are eaten in 10,200 outlets in France each year, putting the 1.5 billion euro ($1.9 billion) industry just behind burgers and pizza, according to Gira Conseil, a market research company. Picture taken October 27, 2014. To match Feature FRANCE-IMMIGRATION/KEBABS    REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)
A vegetarian kebab is seen at OUR restaurant near the Saint-Lazare train station in Paris October 27, 2014. In a country whose national identity is so closely connected to its cuisine, France's hard right has seized on a growing appetite for kebabs as proof of cultural "islamisation". Some 300 million kebabs at about 6 euros each are eaten in 10,200 outlets in France each year, putting the 1.5 billion euro ($1.9 billion) industry just behind burgers and pizza, according to Gira Conseil, a market research company. Picture taken October 27, 2014. To match Feature FRANCE-IMMIGRATION/KEBABS REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY BUSINESS IMMIGRATION)

Washington: Start dining in to keep diabetes at bay as a recent study has revealed that if you eat more meals prepared at home, you may reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

According to the research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015, people who ate about two homemade lunches or dinners each day had a 13 percent lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes compared to people who ate less than six homemade lunches or dinners a week. Type 2 diabetes is a major risk factor for heart disease.

The trend for eating commercially prepared meals in restaurants or as take-out in the United States has increased significantly over the last 50 years, said Geng Zong, Ph.D., a research fellow at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts. “At the same time, Type 2 diabetes rates have also increased.”

In the current study, the researchers demonstrated that eating homemade meals was associated with less weight gain over eight years in these middle-aged and older health professionals. Overweight and obesity are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes.

While researchers don’t provide a specific number of homemade meals people should eat each week, Zong said “more could be better.” (ANI)